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Minimum Wage
2018 Legislative Wrap-Up

The 2018 legislative session has come to a close and our State Legislature passed a few bills that affect Hawaii’s labor and employment laws.  Some of the areas of law that have been (or will be) impacted include the following:

  • Increased Workers’ Compensation Reimbursement Rates (for firefighters only)
  • Pay Secrecy and Pay Transparency
  • Paid Family Leave (Study Only; Due September 2019)
  • Medical Cannabis Working Groups

The Hawaii Employers Council has published its Legislative Digest following the Governor’s Veto Deadline.  The digest can be viewed here:  2018 Employment Law Bills after Veto Deadline.

In addition, some of the labor and employment bills that died this year include the following:

  • Notice of Work Schedules
  • Paid Sick Leave
  • Medical Marijuana Job Protection
  • Social Media Privacy
  • Mandatory Meal Breaks
  • Minimum Wage Increases
  • Workers’ Compensation Presumptions
 
2018 Legislative Proposals

The 2018 legislative session is well underway.This year, lawmakers introduced dozens of bills that could impact many different areas of labor and employment law.  For instance, some of these proposals could revise Hawaii law on the following topics:

  • Notice of Work Schedules
  • Paid Sick Leave
  • Hiring Practices
  • Employment Discrimination
  • Paid Family and Medical Leave
  • Pay Secrecy and Transparency
  • Social Media Privacy
  • Workplace TRO’s
  • Independent Contractors
  • Wage Discrimination
  • Minimum Wage
  • Workers Compensation
  • Temporary Disability Insurance

Many of these measures have been heard and passed out by their assigned committees, whereas others may end up on the cutting room floor this week.  The Hawaii Employers Council (“HEC”) will be closely monitoring these bills during the 2018 legislative session.

You can view a listing of bills that HEC will be monitoring here:  2018 Employment Bills Introduced.   An updated list of bills will be issued following the First Crossover deadline.

 
Nationwide Injunction Imposed Against New FLSA Rules

It looks like Christmas has come early for employers all around the country.  On November 22, 2016, a federal judge from Texas issued a nationwide preliminary injunction prohibiting the U.S. Department of Labor from enforcing its new rules regarding the executive, administrative, and professional (“EAP”) exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Hooray!

hooray

For all those employers who were going to be converted to non-exempt status solely because of the increased salary threshold, those employees can remain exempt.  For those employees who were set to receive a pay increase due to the new FLSA rules, employers will need to make the tough decision on whether they will still increase employees’ salaries.  Some factors to consider are whether the pay increases have already been implemented or announced, the potential impact on morale, and the company’s budget.

To view a copy of the court’s decision, please click on the following link:  FLSA Rules Preliminary Injunction.

 
Brace Yourselves: The DOL’s New Overtime Rules Are Here

On Tuesday, May 17, 2016, news broke that the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) will be publicly issuing their final rules regarding overtime exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act on Wednesday, May 18, 2016.  The final rule will raise the salary threshold exemption from $23,660 to $47,476, which is more than double the current amount.  While the salary threshold is not quite the $50,440 that was initially proposed by the DOL, it is still certainly a very high number that will negatively impact many small businesses, non-profit organizations, and other companies that simply cannot afford to raise salaries to $47k for all of their exempt employees.

The final rule will also trigger automatic increases to the salary threshold every three years, beginning on January 1, 2020.  To put it lightly, this escalator clause could prove to be a real back breaker for many companies.  Under the DOL’s estimation, this would increase the salary threshold to $51,168 in 2020.  It is also not clear whether the DOL has fully thought about the implications of this escalator clause, but that is a different discussion for another day (see below).

In addition, the final rule also raises the salary threshold that is used for the “highly compensated employees” exemption from $100,000 to $134,004.   With the escalator clause, this number is estimated by the DOL to be $147,524 in 2020.

Finally, the new rule also provides that non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) can be used to satisfy up to 10% of the new standard salary level, as long as they are paid on a quarterly basis (or sooner).

The new rules will take effect on December 1, 2016.  This gives employers just under 200 days to start preparing for these major rule changes.

Certainly, this is BIG NEWS!  And bad news, too.

In order to assist employers with understanding and preparing for the DOL’s final overtime rule, the Hawaii Employers Council (“HEC”) will be conducting a seminar/webinar next Wednesday from 8:30 to 10:30 am.  This program will contain three main components:  (1) a discussion of the current and new rule; (2) actions plans employers can implement in response to the new rule; and (3) how to communicate with employees about changes that are (or will be) implemented by the employer.  I will be presenting the first part of the program.  

Here are some links for further information:

Oh, one last thing – I should also note that the final rules do not make any changes to the duties tests for the Executive, Administrative and Professional exemptions.  Employers can probably view that as a good thing, although I do not think such changes were likely because the DOL did not include them in its proposed rule.  Therefore, implementing such changes would have probably been in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act anyway.

 
Let’s Talk About Drugs and Money, But Not in the Same Sentence (Quotes in the PBN)

Just recently, the Pacific Business News published a couple short articles where they included my thoughts about what we can expect during the upcoming legislative session.  The first article talked about possible medical marijuana legislation and the second article discussed Hawaii wage and hour law.

With regards to medical marijuana, I mentioned that we can expect to see bills that propose to expand the rights of medical marijuana patients in two ways.  First, medical marijuana is currently available only to individuals who have a debilitating condition, such as cancer, glaucoma, severe pain, or PTSD.  With the growing social acceptance of medical marijuana, we will likely see legislation opening up marijuana to conditions such as anxiety, stress, insomnia, and arthritis.  Second, we might also see measures that provide job protection for users of medical marijuana – meaning that an employer would be prohibited from firing an employee because the employee uses medical marijuana.

With regards to wage and hour law, we might see an increase in the salary threshold for Hawaii wage and hour exemption, which is currently set at $2,000 per month (in other words, an employee who is guaranteed a salary of $2,000 per month is exempt from Hawaii minimum wage and OT requirements, although they still need to comply with federal law).  Such legislation is especially likely in light of the DOL’s proposed increases to the salary basis for the FLSA’s exemptions.

You can read a copy of the articles here:  Medical Marijuana and Wage and Hour Exemption.